Abbreviated title
The report of the committee of the Lords of his Majesty's most Honourable Privy-Council, in relation to Mr. Wood's half-Pence and farthings
JSA Identification Number
9_24_1
Teerink/Scouten Number
22
ESTC Number
T706
Copy and its Location
CUL, Hib.8.730.9
Publisher and Printer
The Hibernian patriot: Being a collection of the Drapier's letters to the people of Ireland, concerning Mr. Wood's brass half-pence, Vol. , pp .
London, Moor, A. (pseudonym), 1730.

Commentary

This is not a piece by Swift, but it is included in the collections of the Drapier’s Letters. The Hibernian Patriot is a London reprint of Faulkner’s collected edition of the Drapier’s Letters, which in turn derives from Harding’s first editions. It has interest as a London printing, and as the basis for Faulkner’s text in his Works (1735). Herbert Davis says there is some overlap between the ornaments used here and those in the Faulkner’s Works (Drapier’s Letters (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1935), p. xciii), but makes no more of it. This publication clearly comes from the close relations between Faulkner and William Bowyer in this period. This edition is entered in the Bowyer Ledgers, No. 1471.

William Bowyer, Sr. (1663-1737) and Jr. (1699-1777) were the major literary printers of the eighteenth century. They are the focus of John Nichols, Literary Anecdotes of the Eighteenth Century, 9 vols. (1812) and their records have been studied by Keith Maslen. They developed a special relationship with George Faulkner, who had once worked at their shop, in the late 1720s and early 1730s. A. Moor is not the name of a real bookseller, but a device to disguise the identity of the real undertaker of the edition.

References: The Prose Writings of Jonathan Swift, ed. Herbert Davis and others, 16 vols. (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1939-74), vol. x, p. 191; The Bowyer Ledgers, ed. Keith Maslen and John Lancaster (London: Bibliographical Society; New York: Bibliographical Society of America); Keith Maslen, ‘George Faulkner and William Bowyer: The London Connection’, in his An Early London printing House at Work: Studies in the Bowyer Ledgers (New York: Bibliographical Society of America, 1993), pp. 223-33.